Fried Alligator Poppers

05/18/2014

gator.poppers

Gary teaches a week-long microbiology class once a year to about 30 students who come from developing countries all over the world. For the past couple of years, we’ve hosted a handful of them at our house. They’re always so gracious, and it’s great fun to learn about other corners of the planet. One year it was five Egyptians, another year it was a Nepalese, Mongolian and Republic of Georgian, and one year it was all 35 of them from every continent minus Antarctica. This year it was a Romanian, a Bangladeshi, and a Californian (?).

I am always conscious about trying to plan meals to abide by others’ moral, physical, and religious food restrictions when we have guests over. In this case, we had a Muslim Bangladeshi who didn’t eat pork, and a Californian vegetarian who didn’t eat red blooded mammals. But everyone gobbled up and enjoyed our fried alligator popper appetizers from the gator that Gary caught! Gator meat: the new food that brings all cultures together. I love it!

Ingredients:

Poppers:
1 lb alligator meat (or seriously anything else. Vegetables, any kinds of meat, cardboard even…everything tastes good fried.)
1 c flour
1 t paprika
1 t chili powder
1 t cumin
S&P
2 eggs
1/2 c water
1/2 gallon peanut or canola oil

Sauce:
1 c mayo
1/8-1/4 c sriracha sauce
S&P

Instructions:

First, cut up your alligator (or other meat) into one-inch pieces. Dry off the meat, salt and pepper them, and set aside. Next, mix up your dry ingredients in a bowl. Set aside. Make your sauce by mixing the mayo, sriracha, and S&P together. Set aside. Beat two eggs in a bowl with the 1/2 c of water. Before you go any further, get your oil in a skillet hot. We use a big cast iron skillet and put it on an outside propane burner since the oil splatters and makes a mess. Next, take your alligator, dunk it into the egg mixture, dredge it in flour, and fry it for about 1-2 minutes, or until golden brown. Dunk in the hot mayo sauce. And toast to the beauty of differing cultures and the fact that despite different languages, religions, and homelands, everyone is, more or less, exactly the same.

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