Posts from April 2015

Kale and Sausage Galette

04/23/2015

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According to Gary, “galette” is French for “pot pie”. In the real world, a galette is a rustic crust that you can fill with all sorts of savory or sweet ingredients. This great blog post here shows a number of tasty looking ones: apple & caramel, tomato & corn, fig & prosciutto. I’m set on trying many more permutations down the road.

The recipe I used was amended from here. I used the two kinds of kale from my garden and my sorrel, but feel free to use any hearty greens you can find. My crust is, um, not the prettiest, but it did the job. I blame this on the fact that I am neither French, nor my grandmother. I will sadly never be the former, but I do hope to someday be a baker and crust-maker as fabulous as the latter.

Ingredients:

For the crust:
2/3 c all-purpose flour
1/3 c wheat flour
1/2 t sea salt
6 T cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
2 to 4 T ice cold water

Add the flours, salt, and butter to a food processor and pulse until you have fine crumbles.  Add the water slowly, pulsing until the dough comes together into a ball (you may not need all the water, so add a little at a time).  Try not to overwork the dough too much. Form into a ball and flatten.  Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour or even overnight.

For the galette:
1 lb of kale
1 bunch sorrel (optional)
1 small jar of artichoke hearts
1/2 lb sausage, cooked
1 onion, chopped
Olive oil
6 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
1/4 c Parmesan cheese, finely grated
1 T chopped dill
Zest of half a lemon
1 egg, whisked
Squeeze of lemon
S&P
1 egg (for egg wash)

Instructions:

First, bring a large pot of water to a boil to blanch the greens (you can leave all the stems on the kale). Just before blanching add a couple tablespoons of salt to the water.  Place the greens into the water, cook for one minute, then transfer immediately to a cold water bath.  Drain.  Squeeze out as much water as possible.  Roughly chop.  Set aside.

Next, heat a large skillet.  Cook the sausage until done. Remove the sausage. Don’t clean the pan, and add the onions, season with salt and pepper, and saute for about 5 minutes.  Set aside to cool. In a large bowl, mix the chopped greens, artichokes, sauteed onions, feta, Parmesan, chopped dill, and lemon zest.  Mix in the egg.  Add a squeeze of lemon juice.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees (with your pizza stone, if using).  Lightly flour your work surface.  Roll out the dough into a large, thin circle on parchment paper.  Place your filling in the middle, leaving a couple of inches clean around the edges.  Scatter a few artichoke wedges on top.  Fold in the edges so they overlap a bit.  Continue all the way around, until all edges are folded in.  Brush the top of the dough with egg wash.  Slide the galette on the parchment paper onto the pizza stone (or if you don’t have one, just use a baking pan). Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until golden brown.

Beet & Goat Cheese Sandwich

04/20/2015

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Aren’t beets beautiful? I’m just going to leave it today at that.

Ingredients (for one sandwich):

1 pickled beet
2 oz goat cheese
crusty bread
Arugula

Instructions:

Toast your bread, smear on your cheese, add arugula, and top with your sliced beets. Add some S&P, or a drizzle of olive oil, and you’ve got yourself a bright and beautiful sandwich! Enjoy!

Chocolate Lemongrass Mousse

04/14/2015

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Last night, Gary and I had an über-delicious Asian-themed meal made by a friend who spent a couple of years in China. (You better believe I will be making his soup, and posting the recipe here soon.) We talked about Ryan’s 5-week trip walking the Great Wall, and what it was like to be a tall blond guy living in China.

I was tasked with dessert, so I stuck with the East-West fusion theme of chocolate + lemongrass. It could have been more lemongrassy for me, so I’m adding that into the recipe. My crop obviously is still less than desired, but my motto is do what you can with what you’ve got.

I amended this recipe from Epicurious.

Ingredients:

4 stalks lemongrass, chopped
2 c chilled heavy cream
4 egg yolks
3 T sugar
1 t vanilla
7 oz good quality dark chocolate

Instructions:

First, take off the course layer of lemongrass on each stalk. Chop into inch-sized pieces. Next, heat 3/4 cup cream in a 1-quart heavy saucepan until hot. (Some recipes say to soak the lemongrass in the cream, and leave in the fridge for a couple of hours.) Whisk together yolks, sugar, and a pinch of salt in another bowl until combined well, then add hot cream in a slow stream, whisking until combined. Transfer mixture to saucepan and cook over moderately low heat, stirring constantly, until it registers 160°F on thermometer. Pour custard through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl which strains the lemongrass, and stir in vanilla.

Melt chocolate in a double boiler or a metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water, stirring frequently. Whisk custard into chocolate until smooth, then cool.

Beat remaining 1 1/4 cups cream in a bowl with an electric mixer until it just holds stiff peaks. Whisk one fourth of cream into chocolate custard to lighten, then fold in remaining cream gently but thoroughly.

Spoon mousse into 8 (6-ounce) stemmed glasses or ramekins and chill until ready to serve. Garnish with whipped cream, or mint and grated chocolate, like I did.

Carrot Curry Kimchi

04/11/2015

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Kimchi, I’ll admit, is an acquired taste. It’s pungent and smelly, and like good stinky cheese, most people either love or hate it. From Korea, it’s similar to sauerkraut or pickles in that it uses lacto-fermentation. The magic behind lacto-fermentation is that the older the food is, the more delicious it becomes. I found a batch I made buried in the back of the fridge one time that I think had been there for over a year! (How fabulous is it when you find forgotten things in the fridge that actually taste BETTER than when they were placed there originally?)

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{My foot-long carrot!}

Koreans apparently use kimchi as a side salad, whereas Americans tend to use them like I do, as condiments. I took to eating curried kimchi on eggs after trying some local kimchi that my sister had; even since then my eggs + kimchi have been a breakfast or lunch staple. I like the curry flavor with carrots and cabbage, but if you do some digging, you’ll find that there are a myriad of kimchi recipes that include radishes, cucumbers, scallions, pumpkin, even fermented fish. It can be as spicy (or not) as you prefer, too.

Ingredients:

1 head cabbage
2 T curry powder
kosher salt
red hot pepper flakes
1-2 carrots, grated

Instructions:

Like my sauerkraut instructions, these too are pretty vague. That said, it’s hard to mess up. First, clean a mason jar. Next, chop your cabbage and shred your carrots. Put a handful of cabbage and carrots in the bottom of the mason jar. Use the stick end of a wooden spoon and mash the cabbage for a minute or so to release the juices. Sprinkle on about half a teaspoon of salt, some of the curry powder and a dash of red peppers. Do this inch-by-inch until the mason jar is full. The jar should have some liquid in it from the cabbage, but fill the rest of the jar up with water. Set the jar on the counter with the lid on loosely for 1-2 days. After that, put it in the refrigerator. In about 2-3 weeks it should be ready for eating. The longer it lives, the more pungent (and delicious!) it becomes.

Kale Salad with Tahini Dressing

04/08/2015

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Due to our warm weather, my garden’s lettuce is done. It bolted, was pulled, and is now compost. But my kale keeps thriving! I hadn’t been drawn to it much for I had a whole bed of tender lettuce that would beckon instead. So with the greens pulled and gone, I guess now it’s Kale’s time to shine in the recipe spotlight.

Ingredients:

For the tahini dressing:
1/3 c tahini paste
1 garlic clove
2 T fresh lemon juice
1 T miso paste
1/3 c olive oil
S&P

For the salad:
2 bunches of kale, de-veined and chopped
4 T sesame seeds
4 radishes, very thinly sliced

Instructions:

Combine all the dressing ingredients in a food processor (or mix well in a closed mason jar). Chop the kale, and add the dressing to it. (I found it best to massage the dressing in with my fingers.) Add the nuts and radishes. Serve as a side, or add protein (chicken, fish, tofu) to make as a main meal.

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