Carrot Curry Kimchi

04/11/2015

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kimchi, I’ll admit, is an acquired taste. It’s pungent and smelly, and like good stinky cheese, most people either love or hate it. From Korea, it’s similar to sauerkraut or pickles in that it uses┬álacto-fermentation. The magic behind lacto-fermentation is that the older the food is, the more delicious it becomes. I found a batch I made buried in the back of the fridge one time that I think had been there for over a year! (How fabulous is it when you find forgotten things in the fridge that actually taste BETTER than when they were placed there originally?)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

{My foot-long carrot!}

Koreans apparently use kimchi as a side salad, whereas Americans tend to use them like I do, as condiments. I took to eating curried kimchi on eggs after trying some local kimchi that my sister had; even since then my eggs + kimchi have been a breakfast or lunch staple. I like the curry flavor with carrots and cabbage, but if you do some digging, you’ll find that there are a myriad of kimchi recipes that include radishes, cucumbers, scallions, pumpkin, even fermented fish. It can be as spicy (or not) as you prefer, too.

Ingredients:

1 head cabbage
2 T curry powder
kosher salt
red hot pepper flakes
1-2 carrots, grated

Instructions:

Like my sauerkraut instructions, these too are pretty vague. That said, it’s hard to mess up. First, clean a mason jar. Next, chop your cabbage and shred your carrots. Put a handful of cabbage and carrots in the bottom of the mason jar. Use the stick end of a wooden spoon and mash the cabbage for a minute or so to release the juices. Sprinkle on about half a teaspoon of salt, some of the curry powder and a dash of red peppers. Do this inch-by-inch until the mason jar is full. The jar should have some liquid in it from the cabbage, but fill the rest of the jar up with water. Set the jar on the counter with the lid on loosely for 1-2 days. After that, put it in the refrigerator. In about 2-3 weeks it should be ready for eating. The longer it lives, the more pungent (and delicious!) it becomes.

0 Comments

Leave a Comment

All rights reserved © Pitchforks & Butter Knives · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: